Author Topic: OGG Conversion Problems  (Read 13454 times)

Daniel 25

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OGG Conversion Problems
« on: 2 Aug '04 - 20:30 »
Alright...
So I used XMPlay30 to convert a wav file to an ogg file. So now...how do i open the ogg file into MO3? It says that "this is not a recognized file" somehow i feel like im missing a step somewhere. Sorry...this is all really new to me! I'm still learning all this. I love these programs and what they have the ability to do...I just dont know how to use them yet! I am trying to convert a 42Mb wav file to somewhere around a 4Mb mp3 or mo3 file. I dont know how to...or if i even can. Thank you so much for all your help and support!

Zarggg

  • Posts: 1242
Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #1 on: 3 Aug '04 - 17:57 »
Not sure exactly what you mean. WAV files cannot be converted into MO3 files; MO3 is a module format in which the instruments themselves are compressed. It's not a stream format, like MP3, Ogg, FLAC, etc.

Daniel 25

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Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #2 on: 4 Aug '04 - 04:06 »
i already have the song into an ogg file. I just need to know how to convert an ogg file into an MO3 file. By the way...a correction...the wav file was only 17 MBs...now as an ogg file it is only about 3MBs. I need to convert it from the ogg file into an MO3 file if possible...how do i do that? Thanks again for all your help. I really appreciate it.

Irrational86

  • Posts: 960
Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #3 on: 4 Aug '04 - 04:18 »
Daniel, there are different Audio file formats. There are differences between ones called Modules, and the standard MP3, OGG, WAV, etc. files. Modules are composed of predefined instruments, which means that each different instrument has a specific sound. MP3, OGG, and the rest are PCM audio, which means that it is composed of sound data, in other words, no predefined instruments or tunes. The MO3 format is used to compress the instrument sounds composed in the Modules. Because of this, you can't simply convert a WAV, OGG, or an MP3 into an MO3 file.

If you don't understand something, just ask please.

Daniel 25

  • Guest
Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #4 on: 4 Aug '04 - 04:34 »
Thank you...that makes complete sense actually. But...then why does the MO3 program have an "OGG encoder"? Sorry...im still learning all this. Thanks again for all your help...this is all starting to make some sense.

Irrational86

  • Posts: 960
Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #5 on: 4 Aug '04 - 04:43 »
PCM data is the sound format that sound cards understand, and transform into electric signals sent to the speakers, then the speakers output these signals as sound waves through the air. This PCM data occupies quite a lot of space for just one second of sound, meaning that if a sound file was to be saved in this format, it would be huge (An example are WAV files, most WAV files commonly have PCM data). To shrink the size of audio files, the MP3 format, OGG, FLAC, APE, and many other formats were created. These formats simply take the PCM data, and compress it at a user-specified quality level, to save space. Now, the "MP3 encoder" and "OGG encoder" in the MO3 format simply take the Modules' instruments, and compress it, just like it would do with PCM data.

Feel free to ask more questions...
« Last Edit: 4 Aug '04 - 04:44 by XMinioNX »

Dotpitch

  • Posts: 2871
Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #6 on: 4 Aug '04 - 22:13 »
instruments aren't the only things compressed, it's mainly the samples that eat up all the space (like speech or strange sound-effects). in a regular mod (xm/it/s3m) these samples are uncompressed (plain wav), and in mo3 these samples are compressed by lame, oggenc, or any encoder you like.

Torkell

  • Posts: 1169
Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #7 on: 5 Aug '04 - 15:25 »
MO3 also compresses the pattern/order data and any comments. There's also a lossless codec builtin, and by using the lossless alone you can generally get a 50% reduction in file size.

Daniel 25

  • Guest
Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #8 on: 17 Aug '04 - 20:59 »
Is there any way I can compress a wav file? Is there any way I can save a wav file as an mp3? If there is any way to do either of these things...how?

Torkell

  • Posts: 1169
Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #9 on: 17 Aug '04 - 21:32 »
Is there any way I can compress a wav file? Is there any way I can save a wav file as an mp3? If there is any way to do either of these things...how?
Yep. To turn a WAV file into a MP3, use something like LAME. I've never really used it myself, but if you go looking on Google you should be able to easily find a copy of LAME and the instructions that go with it.
MO3 won't do this - it's for a different type of file (module as opposed to stream).

Pike84

  • Posts: 1398
Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #10 on: 6 Dec '04 - 23:20 »
Is there any way I can compress a wav file? Is there any way I can save a wav file as an mp3? If there is any way to do either of these things...how?
Here are some instructions for you: go to http://www.rarewares.org/mp3.html and download a LAME encoder and a frontend for it (a program that will act as the encoder's user interface). I recommend getting version 3.96.1 of the encoder and LAMEDrop for a simple frontend (get the one without an encoder included). Now, extract the zip files to somewhere on your HD (preferrably to their own folders) and run LAMEDrop.exe. Right-click the box that will appear and go to "Options->LAME...", then go to the folder where you extracted the encoder before and select the executable (lame.exe).

That's pretty much all there is to it. Now, all you have to do is drag'n'drop your wav file(s) to the LAMEDrop box and you'll get mp3 files. They'll be in the same place with the source files by default, but you can change this in the options if you like. I recommend using the default quality setting (fast standard) for a good size to quality ratio. All the "Preset" quality settings use variable bitrate (VBR), which is always better than using a constant bitrate (CBR), because with VBR bits get allocated well where they are needed.

Note, that you can also use other encoders, like musepack (mpc) or ogg vorbis, that can also be found at rarewares. Their usage is more or less the same, especially since they have similar frontends, musedrop and oggrop.

[EDIT]Oh gee, didn't realize this thread was a bit old already.. oh well.
« Last Edit: 6 Dec '04 - 23:38 by Pike84 »

Zarggg

  • Posts: 1242
Re:OGG Conversion Problems
« Reply #11 on: 7 Dec '04 - 01:43 »
Even if no one reads it, at least you did your best! :P