Author Topic: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file  (Read 4608 times)

vindlex

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Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« on: 11 Aug '13 - 19:45 »
Let's say,  I saved live audio stream as one continuous Mp3 file. Is it possible to get metadata tags for each track in this file and apply it?

Dotpitch

  • Posts: 2871
Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #1 on: 12 Aug '13 - 06:31 »
In the Write-to-disk-dialog, you should check 'Write CUE sheet', this will save an additional CUE file with all the titles. XMPlay will automatically use the CUE file if you're playing the audio file.

If you've saved a file without a CUE sheet, then no, the metadata is not there anymore.

vindlex

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Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #2 on: 12 Aug '13 - 12:15 »
Thank you for the helpful tip.
Another question: I noticed one issue when recording a separate tracks: the track's splitting point is not detected correctly. In all cases, it cut off the track before the current track actually ends. Accordingly, the new track start from this unfinished piece of previous track (fade out), rather than the beginning of a new track. This is because the server sends the metadata about the new track a little earlier than the current track actually ends. XMplay splits tracks based on new metadata received, immediately on receipt, without waiting for complete end of track(fade out). This issue affect Screamer Radio player too. Is the way to solve this?

saga

  • Posts: 2180
Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #3 on: 12 Aug '13 - 12:27 »
Quote
Is the way to solve this?
No, because that's just how ShoutCast works. ShoutCast sends a continuous stream of song data, not single songs. The metadata is separate from the song data, so it's not always completely in sync.

vindlex

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Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #4 on: 12 Aug '13 - 14:28 »
Isn't possible to make XMplay split tracks with some delay, waiting the end of fade out?

Jimmy Neutron

  • Posts: 473
Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #5 on: 12 Aug '13 - 14:55 »
I do this to create CDs of mp3s to play in the car for long trips (1600 miles one way) and have devised a method to address the incorrect break points between songs.

I sort the directory of songs by creation time, so they are in the order in which the streaming radio station played them.

I use MP3DirectCut and open two windows, expanded height, side-by-side, and a file manager below.

I drop the first song (which is missing the last few seconds) in one window, and the next song in the second window.

In the second song's window, I tag from the beginning to the end of the first song's sound.  Cut it to the clipboard, go to the first song's window, go to the end of the song, paste from clipboard, write to disk, drop the third song into the first window, pick up the tail end of the second song, cut it, go to the second song's window, go to the end of the song, paste, write to disk, and repeat.

This is best done with keyboard shortcuts.  After a little while, you can see in the waveform the places to cut, and do it without having to listen very carefully to the songs.  I find I can process 2-3 songs per minute when I'm in the "zone", so a whole CD takes about an hour to do.  Oh... I also cut out the station ID spots and advertisements (if any) too.  If any track is too problematic, it gets cut, too.

Finally, since most CD players will "help" you by sorting the disc alphabetically, I rename all the songs to begin with a consecutive number, such as 001-Artist - Title.  I use a file manager such as FreeCommander that will prefix the numbers automatically, so all the files for the whole disc are renamed in seconds.  Since the CD player displays the internal ID tag instead of the name of the actual file, things look fine even with the numbers there.

I know it sounds rather crazy, but it does go quickly so you can get the product you want.  Let me know if you need a hand with any of the steps.

Dotpitch

  • Posts: 2871
Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #6 on: 12 Aug '13 - 16:43 »
Isn't possible to make XMplay split tracks with some delay, waiting the end of fade out?
The delay can be different for each track. To do this right, you should decode the audio around a title change, look for a silence and split the tracks there. Take a look at Streamripper (or one of it's GUIs like StationRipper), because it uses exactly this method to adapt the song splits.

vindlex

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Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #7 on: 12 Aug '13 - 23:42 »
I understand this method, but it looks a little bit complicated. I tried another way: I saved single continuous Mp3 file and cue file. Then I loaded this mp3 into Audacity and found a more precise start/end time, and wrote them in a notepad. Then I edited cue file and replaced time with new time. After this I splitted mp3 into separate tracks using mp3DirectCut.
However, I found that the end and start of some track's overlap, so the overall quality is not so good.

vindlex

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Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #8 on: 13 Aug '13 - 00:16 »
The delay can be different for each track. To do this right, you should decode the audio around a title change, look for a silence and split the tracks there. Take a look at Streamripper (or one of it's GUIs like StationRipper), because it uses exactly this method to adapt the song splits.
yes, the delay is different for each track. Problem is that many tracks have overlapping, so splitting points isn't very precise. So recording one continuous mp3 looks better option.

Jimmy Neutron

  • Posts: 473
Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #9 on: 13 Aug '13 - 03:10 »
However, I found that the end and start of some track's overlap, so the overall quality is not so good.

Luckily the station I used doesn't overlap.  It may kill the trailing decay, but starts the next track cleanly.  Once it gets processed, the songs still sound pretty good.

Dotpitch

  • Posts: 2871
Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #10 on: 13 Aug '13 - 06:24 »
Problem is that many tracks have overlapping, so splitting points isn't very precise. So recording one continuous mp3 looks better option.
Yep, then you should go for one MP3+CUE. Is that good enough for you?

vindlex

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Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #11 on: 13 Aug '13 - 21:20 »
Yep, then you should go for one MP3+CUE. Is that good enough for you?

Yes, single MP3+CUE would be OK. It will not show tracks on Walkman flash mp3 player, though.

How to cut track (last one) from mp3 file using mp3DirectCut? I just used it only once, a long time ago.

Jimmy Neutron

  • Posts: 473
Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #12 on: 13 Aug '13 - 23:54 »
How to cut track (last one) from mp3 file using mp3DirectCut? I just used it only once, a long time ago.

Go to where you want to begin the cut.
Hit {B} as "beginning" mark.
Go to the end of what you want to cut.
Hit {N} as "eNd" mark.
See the section to cut highlighted.
Hit the DELETE key.
Save.

Edit: You want to write to disk {Ctrl-W}, else the "save" will keep the cut section, I believe.
« Last Edit: 13 Aug '13 - 23:57 by Jimmy Neutron »

vindlex

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Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #13 on: 14 Aug '13 - 20:50 »
Go to where you want to begin the cut.
Hit {B} as "beginning" mark.
Go to the end of what you want to cut.
Hit {N} as "eNd" mark.
See the section to cut highlighted.
Hit the DELETE key.
Save.

Edit: You want to write to disk {Ctrl-W}, else the "save" will keep the cut section, I believe.

Some details: should I use Cut, not Crop, to delete selection? Also to create fade out: I selected 1.5 sec at the end and applied fade (Edit - Create simple fade). The faded part is brown color now. Should I then just 'Save complete audio' (Ctrl+W), or first select all audio (make it same color)?

Jimmy Neutron

  • Posts: 473
Re: Find metadata tags in continuous Mp3 file
« Reply #14 on: 14 Aug '13 - 21:37 »
Well, I just hit the DELETE key.  I don't know what it is called in clicky-menu speak.

Ctrl-W writes the whole thing to disk, not just a piece of it.

As long as you don't over-write the original, the worst that can happen if you experiment is that you've lost a few seconds of your time.  If it gets totally messed up, get another copy of the original and try it again, differently this time.