Author Topic: Some XMPlay questions  (Read 163 times)

Nuno

  • Posts: 10
Some XMPlay questions
« on: 26 Jul '20 - 13:51 »
Hi! I have two relatively simple questions so creating a thread for every one of them would be a spam.
1. Is there a way to make it that whenevr I launch a new file, the program doesn't become visible on top (doesn't become the active window)?
2. How to enable gapless playback? I heard this software can do it well but I havent seen the option.

saga

  • Posts: 2407
Re: Some XMPlay questions
« Reply #1 on: 26 Jul '20 - 14:31 »
Quote
2. How to enable gapless playback? I heard this software can do it well but I havent seen the option.
There is no option to enable, because XMPlay is gapless by design. However, you may have to increase the output buffer length if you are playing files from a slow drive in order for the file content to be available in time for XMPlay to play it. Overly aggressive disk suspension power plans may also be a bad idea for gapless playback.

Nuno

  • Posts: 10
Re: Some XMPlay questions
« Reply #2 on: 26 Jul '20 - 15:13 »
Then I don't understand something. When I play some tracks, there's silence inbetween them. I thought it will allow me to have some kind of smooth transitions.

saga

  • Posts: 2407
Re: Some XMPlay questions
« Reply #3 on: 26 Jul '20 - 15:29 »
Gapless playback will not remove intentional silence at the start or end of files. It simply means that if two files have no trailing and leading silence respectively, the audio player can play them without an audible gap. Many players appear to have issues with this but with XMPlay it's not a problem at all. Note that some compressed file formats, most notably MP3, don't support gapless files out of the box. The LAME MP3 encoder can create gapless MP3 files, but in particular if you have older MP3 files made with a different encoder, they may have silence between tracks even if they were meant to be gapless. In that case, even if the source material has no gaps (e.g. a live recording with audience noise between tracks), there will still be an interruption unless the file was encoded properly with LAME. Formats like Ogg Vorbis or FLAC don't have this issue.
If you want smooth transitions regardless of trailing silence in files, you may want to look into the crossfade option.